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Watch the highlights of NVIDIA’s GPU Technology Conference keynote

Under NVIDIA founder Jensen Huang’s iconic leather jacket is one of the tech industry’s sharpest CEOs — a man who can not only talk eloquently about GPU architecture, machine learning and the limits of Moore’s Law, but do so for hours without a strict script. It’s an impressive feat, but if you’re not well versed in the technology of server GPUs, his talks can be a little hard to digest. That’s why we cut Huang’s two hour GTC keynote into an easily digestible clipshow.

NVIDIA’s GPU Technology Conference may be mostly aimed at developers and businesses, but the company still had a few exciting things to show off, including Project Holodeck (no, not that project holodeck), NVIDIA’s take on high-end virtual reality teleconferencing. Still, most of the presentation was focused on how the company’s latest supercomputer GPU facilitates deep learning artificial intelligence — the kind of algorithmic wizardry that lets computers teach themselves how to identify and touch up photos, play golf and autonomously drive cars.

Interested in the details? You get the bulk of them in just under 13 minutes by watching the embedded video above.

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Ms. A. C. Kennedy
My name is Ms A C Kennedy and I am a Health practitioner and Consultant by day and a serial blogger by night. I luv family, life and learning new things. I especially luv learning how to improve my business. I also luv helping and sharing my information with others. Don't forget to ask me anything!

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There's a good reason why security analysts get nervous about bundled third-party software: it can introduce vulnerabilities that the companies can't control. And Microsoft, unfortunately, has learned that the hard way. Google researcher Tavis Ormandy discovered that a Windows 10 image came bundled with a third-party password manager, Keeper, which came with a glaring browser plugin flaw -- a malicious website could steal passwords. Ormandy's copy was an MSDN image meant for developers, but Reddit users noted that they received the vulnerable copy of Keeper after clean reinstalls of regular copies and even a brand new laptop.

A Microsoft spokesperson told Ars Technica that the Keeper team had patched the exploit (in response to Ormandy's private disclosure), so it shouldn't be an issue if your software is up to date. Also, you were only exposed if you enabled the plugin.

However, the very existence of the hole has still raised a concern: are Microsoft's security tests as thorough for third-party apps as its own software? The company has declined to comment, but that kind of screening may prove crucial if Microsoft is going to maintain the trust of Windows users. It doesn't matter how secure Microsoft's code is if a bundled app undermines everything.

Source: Monorail, Tavis Ormandy (Twitter)

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