Home / Software & Service News / US Marines test glider drones that drop supplies to troops

US Marines test glider drones that drop supplies to troops

Since it’s not always possible to deliver supplies to troops in dangerous regions by land or sea, the Pentagon uses steerable parachutes called Joint Precision Airdrop System or JPADS. They’re expensive and difficult to retrieve, though, that’s why the US Marines tested a much cheaper and more practical alternative: disposable glider drones that cost only around $1,500 to $3,000 make. Their creator, Logistics Glider, build them out of plywood, household hardware and off-the-shelf electronics, yet they’re capable of carrying up to 1,600 pounds for up to 74 nautical miles. That’s thrice JPAD’s range for a fraction of what the parachute system costs ($29,700).

Logistics Glider sought help from the University of California to develop the glider’s autonomous brain, which takes over as soon as it’s dropped from its carrier aircraft. Upon accomplishing its mission, the drone’s wings and tail automatically snap off when it lands on the ground, perhaps to prevent enemies from copying the technology like what happened to the RQ-170 drone in Iran.

The Marines tested the gliders for 10 days, but they’re keeping the results a secret. If they work as intended, they can be used not just to drop supplies to troops, but relief goods to disaster zones. Depending on their test results, the company might still change the way they work. It’s even looking at the possibility of having the gliders drop small parachutes if that would make deliveries more accurate.

Source: Wired, IEEE

Click Here For Original Source Of The Article

About Ms. A. C. Kennedy

Ms. A. C. Kennedy
My name is Ms A C Kennedy and I am a Health practitioner and Consultant by day and a serial blogger by night. I luv family, life and learning new things. I especially luv learning how to improve my business. I also luv helping and sharing my information with others. Don't forget to ask me anything!

Check Also

Google drops Instant Search to unify mobile and desktop queries

Google drops Instant Search to unify mobile and desktop queries

Google introduced the by-now familiar Instant Search back in 2010. The idea was to make searching faster by updating the results of your search in real time while you typed. Now the company is dropping the feature, according to SearchEngineLand, to bring it more in line with mobile search. The change is effective today.

More than half of all Google searches happen on mobile, so it makes sense that Google would want to unify the way results are displayed across all devices. While you'll still be able to see search suggestions, the results below won't update until you click on Enter or a result, says SearchEngineLand.

"We launched Google Instant back in 2010 with the goal to provide users with the information they need as quickly as possible, even as they typed their searches on desktop devices," a Google spokesperson told Engadget in an email. "Since then, many more of our searches happen on mobile, with very different input and interaction and screen constraints. With this in mind, we have decided to remove Google Instant, so we can focus on ways to make Search even faster and more fluid on all devices."

Source: SearchEngineLand

css.php