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Pissed off investors have had it up to here with Uber

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Two of Uber’s earliest investors have joined the hate-on-Uber parade. 

In a stern open letter published on Medium, Mitch and Freeda Kapor, who invested in Uber in 2010, criticized the company for a history of “toxic patterns” and hiring a “team of insiders to investigate its destructive culture and make recommendations for change.”

Those charged with digging into sexism and sexual harassment allegations that surfaced over the weekend following a female engineer’s scathing blog post all have ties to the company, the early investors point out. They have little faith that the investigation will be truly independent. Arianna Huffington’s on the board, Chief Human Resources Officer Liane Hornsey reports directly to CEO Travis Kalanick, and former attorney general Eric Holder was once a paid lobbyist for Uber. Read more…

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Ms. A. C. Kennedy
My name is Ms A C Kennedy and I am a Health practitioner and Consultant by day and a serial blogger by night. I luv family, life and learning new things. I especially luv learning how to improve my business. I also luv helping and sharing my information with others. Don't forget to ask me anything!

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Kevlar cartilage could help you recover from joint injuries

It can be difficult to fully recover from knee injuries or other damage to your joints, if just because there hasn't been an artificial replacement for cartilage that can withstand as much punishment as the real thing. That may not be an issue in the long run, though: scientists have developed a Kevlar-based hydrogel that behaves like natural cartilage. It mixes a network of Kevlar nanofibers with polyvinyl alcohol to absorb water at rest (like real cartilage does in idle moments) and become extremely resistant to abuse, but releases it under stress -- say, a workout at the gym.

You don't even need a lot of it to replicate a human body's sturdiness and overall functionality. A material with 92 percent water is about as tough as real cartilage, while a 70 percent mix is comparable to rubber. Previous attempts at simulating cartilage couldn't hold enough water to transport nutrients to cells, which made them a poor fit for implants.

There's a long way to go before the material becomes useful. Researchers are hoping to patent the substance and find companies to make it a practical reality. The implications are already quite clear, mind you. If it works as well in patients as it does in lab experiments, it could lead to cartilage implants that are roughly as good as the real tissue they replace. A serious knee injury might not put an end to your running days.

Source: University of Michigan, Wiley Online Library

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