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Opera’s new browser comes with WhatsApp and Messenger built in

Thanks to add-ons and extensions, modern browsers are capable of much more than just accessing websites. However, unless you know what you’re looking for, finding useful tools isn’t necessarily easy. Instead of relying solely on its extension marketplace, Opera hopes to claw back market share from Google Chrome by incorporating additional features into its eponymous software. We’ve already seen it roll out low-power mode and a fully-featured VPN, but now it’s making things a lot more social by integrating messaging apps like WhatsApp, Messenger and Telegram into its sidebar.

The features are included in a new version of Opera, codenamed “Reborn.” It takes a lot of inspiration from the company’s experimental Neon browser, which debuted in January. Instead of using the web or desktop versions of your favorite messaging apps, Reborn neatly arranges them on the side of your browser window, allowing you to chat while you browse.

The feature works in two ways. First, you can pin the icons to the sidebar and click them when you feel the need to chat. The other option is to pin the chat window so that it sits alongside your current tab. If you want to share a photo you’ve found online, simply drag it to the messenger’s icon and the browser will take care of the rest.

While messaging is the banner announcement, Reborn does come with a few additional features. The browser itself has been given a fresh look, with lighter tabs and improved icons. You can also switch between light and dark themes depending on your mood and control how the browser blocks ads. Opera says that while only three services are available at launch, it hopes to add more in the near future.

Source: Opera Blog

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Ms. A. C. Kennedy
My name is Ms A C Kennedy and I am a Health practitioner and Consultant by day and a serial blogger by night. I luv family, life and learning new things. I especially luv learning how to improve my business. I also luv helping and sharing my information with others. Don't forget to ask me anything!

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UK drone rules will require you to take safety tests

UK drone rules will require you to take safety tests

US officials might be easing up on drone regulations, but their UK counterparts are pushing forward. The British government has instituted rules that require you to not only register any robotic aircraft weighing over 250g (0.55lbs), but to take a "safety awareness" test to prove you understand the drone code. Regulators hope that this will lead to fewer drones flying over airports and otherwise causing havoc in British skies. Not that they're taking any chances -- the UK is also planning wider use of geofencing to prevent drones from flying into dangerous airspace.

The new rules come following a study highlighting the dangers of wayward drones. A smaller drone isn't necessarily safer than its larger alternatives, for example -- many of those more compact models have exposed rotors that can do a lot of damage. A drone weighing around 400 g (0.88lbs) can crack the windscreen of a helicopter, while all but the heaviest drones will have trouble cracking the windscreen of an airliner (and then only at speeds you'd expect beyond the airport). While you might not cause as much chaos as some have feared, you could still create a disaster using a compact drone.

It's nothing new to register drones, of course, and it doesn't appear to have dampened enthusiasm in the US. The test adds a wrinkle, though: how willing are you to buy a drone if you know you'll have to take a quiz? The test likely won't slow sales too much, if at all, but it could give people one more reason to pause before buying a drone on impulse. Manufacturers appear to be in favor of the new rulebook, at any rate -- DJI tells the BBC that the UK is striving for a "reasonable" solution that balances safety with a recognition of the advantages that drones can bring to public life.

Source: Gov.uk (1), (2)

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