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Microsoft releases new Windows 10 preview with 7 bug fixes ahead of Fall Creators Update


Two days after the last build, Microsoft today released a new Windows 10 preview for PCs with only bug fixes and improvements. The company is now finalizing the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, which is expected to arrive next month.

Windows 10 is a service, meaning it was built in a very different way from its predecessors so it can be regularly updated with not just fixes, but new features, too. Microsoft has released many such updates, including three major ones: November Update, Anniversary Update, and Creators Update.

Microsoft is now focusing on stability, so don’t expect new features in this build:

This means that we intend to release new builds to Insiders more quickly and that these builds will include mostly bug fixes. You’ll notice that this build includes a bunch of good bug fixes Insiders will enjoy.

This desktop build also includes the following general bug fixes and improvements:

  • Fixed an issue resulting in Asphalt 8 not accepting input in recent flights.
  • Fixed an issue from recent flights where when Slideshow was enabled resuming from sleep a second time might place the Lock screen in a state where it couldn’t be dismissed without pressing Ctrl + Alt + Del.
  • Fixed an issue that caused minimized per-monitor DPI aware windows to miss DPI changes and end up with a mix of DPI scaling upon restoring.
  • Fixed an issue in XAML resulting in text animations appearing slightly blurry in the last flight until the animation had stopped (for example, when loading the main page of Settings).
  • Fixed an issue resulting in progress wheels on certain websites in Microsoft Edge unexpectedly moving out of place during their rotation.
  • Fixed an issue resulting in an unexpected change in mouse sensitivity in the last flight for PCs using non-default display scaling.
  • Fixed an issue resulting in the taskbar being unexpectedly thick if you booted up the PC while plugged in to an external monitor with a different DPI.

Today’s update bumps the Windows 10 build number for PCs from 16273 (made available to testers on August 23) to build 16275. Microsoft this week stopped tracking and listing known issues, so install at your own risk.

Microsoft also released a new Windows 10 Mobile build today, but nobody cares.

The PC Gaming channel is presented by Intel®‘s Game Dev program.

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Windows 10 included password manager with huge security hole

There's a good reason why security analysts get nervous about bundled third-party software: it can introduce vulnerabilities that the companies can't control. And Microsoft, unfortunately, has learned that the hard way. Google researcher Tavis Ormandy discovered that a Windows 10 image came bundled with a third-party password manager, Keeper, which came with a glaring browser plugin flaw -- a malicious website could steal passwords. Ormandy's copy was an MSDN image meant for developers, but Reddit users noted that they received the vulnerable copy of Keeper after clean reinstalls of regular copies and even a brand new laptop.

A Microsoft spokesperson told Ars Technica that the Keeper team had patched the exploit (in response to Ormandy's private disclosure), so it shouldn't be an issue if your software is up to date. Also, you were only exposed if you enabled the plugin.

However, the very existence of the hole has still raised a concern: are Microsoft's security tests as thorough for third-party apps as its own software? The company has declined to comment, but that kind of screening may prove crucial if Microsoft is going to maintain the trust of Windows users. It doesn't matter how secure Microsoft's code is if a bundled app undermines everything.

Source: Monorail, Tavis Ormandy (Twitter)

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