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Is the Super NES Classic worthy of the hype? GamesBeat Decides


The Super NES Classic Edition is out this week, and we got our hands on one. On this week’s episode of the GamesBeat Decides podcast, host and PC gaming editor Jeffrey Grubb asks co-host and reviews editor Mike Minotti whether it lives up to the excitement.

We also talk about the news from the last week. Bethesda wants to get close with Nintendo and its fans. Game developers admit they’re afraid to speak out due to “toxic” gamer culture. Xbox boss Phil Spencer gets a promotion. And w easo talk about Monster Hunter: World and Nier: Automata.

In the second segment, Mike and Jeff spend a lot of time trying to determine what the “core” Mario games are. This is a pointless exercise that we take far too seriously. You should join us and share your list — but only if you agree with our opinions.

Games discussed this week:

  • SteamWorld Dig 2
  • Mystic Melee
  • Thimbleweed Park
  • Super Nintendo Classic Edition

You can listen to the podcast by clicking play here or on the YouTube video above (or you can subscribe using one of the links below):


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My name is Ms A C Kennedy and I am a Health practitioner and Consultant by day and a serial blogger by night. I luv family, life and learning new things. I especially luv learning how to improve my business. I also luv helping and sharing my information with others. Don't forget to ask me anything!

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Samsung’s phone-as-desktop concept now runs Linux

Samsung's DeX is a clever way to turn your phone into a desktop computer. However, there's one overriding problem: you probably don't have a good reason to use it instead of a PC. And Samsung is trying to fix that. It's unveiling Linux on Galaxy, an app-based offering that (surprise) lets you run Linux distributions on your phone. Ostensibly, it's aimed at developers who want to bring their work environment with them wherever they go. You could dock at a remote office knowing that your setup will be the same as usual.

It's not quite the same as your typical Ubuntu or Debian install. Linux on Galaxy launches through an app, and it's using the same kernel as Android itself in order to maintain performance. And it almost goes without saying that you'll really want a DeX setup, since most Linux apps are expecting a large screen, mouse and keyboard.

As it stands, you'll have to be patient. Linux on Galaxy isn't available right now -- you can sign up for alerts, but it's not ready for public consumption. Even so, this is good evidence that Samsung thinks of DeX as considerably more than a novelty feature. It may be a long, long while (if ever) before many people are using their phones as desktops, but Samsung is willing to gradually build up its ecosystem and eventually give you an incentive to take a second look.

Source: Samsung, Linux on Galaxy

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