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Elon Musk expects to have a brain-machine interface in four years

A couple of weeks ago, the Wall Street Journal revealed Elon Musk’s latest venture, Neuralink, and its plan for developing brain-machine interface technology. Now, Musk has invited Tim Urban of Wait But Why to write up an in-depth report of the company and what it’s working on. Neuralink is hardly the only company working on things that will plug into our brains, and earlier this week we got a peek at what Facebook is working on in the area. One new thing we know from this report, however, is that Musk and his team seem pretty close to making it happen — the SpaceX and Tesla founder figures they can have something on the market to treat severe brain injuries “in about four years.”

We are aiming to bring something to market that helps with certain severe brain injuries (stroke, cancer lesion, congenital) in about four years.

For something usable by people without a disability, Musk believes the timeline is more like eight to ten years. But, if the team can pull off the implantable, biocompatible wireless hardware it’s dreaming of, then humans could communicate with computers and even each other with only thought. Elon Musk has repeatedly spoken about the potential danger presented by artificial intelligence, and increasing the “bandwidth” of communication is, he says, a way for humans to be symbiotic with AI instead of being replaced by it.

Neuralink Formula - Wait but Why

As such, much of the write-up is devoted to a discussion of how the brain has developed to enable society as we currently experience, and what the “Wizard Era” of direct brain communication could be if Neuralink succeeds. So far, Musk’s strategy has worked effectively to build his rocket and electricity companies, we’re at least a few years away from finding out if the streak will continue.

Source: Wait But Why

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Ms. A. C. Kennedy
My name is Ms A C Kennedy and I am a Health practitioner and Consultant by day and a serial blogger by night. I luv family, life and learning new things. I especially luv learning how to improve my business. I also luv helping and sharing my information with others. Don't forget to ask me anything!

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Windows 10 included password manager with huge security hole

There's a good reason why security analysts get nervous about bundled third-party software: it can introduce vulnerabilities that the companies can't control. And Microsoft, unfortunately, has learned that the hard way. Google researcher Tavis Ormandy discovered that a Windows 10 image came bundled with a third-party password manager, Keeper, which came with a glaring browser plugin flaw -- a malicious website could steal passwords. Ormandy's copy was an MSDN image meant for developers, but Reddit users noted that they received the vulnerable copy of Keeper after clean reinstalls of regular copies and even a brand new laptop.

A Microsoft spokesperson told Ars Technica that the Keeper team had patched the exploit (in response to Ormandy's private disclosure), so it shouldn't be an issue if your software is up to date. Also, you were only exposed if you enabled the plugin.

However, the very existence of the hole has still raised a concern: are Microsoft's security tests as thorough for third-party apps as its own software? The company has declined to comment, but that kind of screening may prove crucial if Microsoft is going to maintain the trust of Windows users. It doesn't matter how secure Microsoft's code is if a bundled app undermines everything.

Source: Monorail, Tavis Ormandy (Twitter)

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