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AI is absolutely horrible at naming paint colors

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Tired of your boring eggshell walls? A new AI experiment recommends colors like “Sink” or “Bank Butt.”

Researcher Janelle Shane trained a neural network to come up with paint names, and it resulted in gems like “Stoner Blue” and “Turdly,” she wrote in a blog post.

She conducted an experiment by using a training data set of about 7,700 paint names from Sherwin-Williams along with the RGB (red, green, and blue color values). 

She then had the network generate new colors and names for those colors. The results were hugely varied, including colors with Gray or Blue in the name that had nothing to do with those colors, or completely abstract and awesome names like “Stanky Bean.” Read more…

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Ms. A. C. Kennedy
My name is Ms A C Kennedy and I am a Health practitioner and Consultant by day and a serial blogger by night. I luv family, life and learning new things. I especially luv learning how to improve my business. I also luv helping and sharing my information with others. Don't forget to ask me anything!

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Google drops Instant Search to unify mobile and desktop queries

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Google introduced the by-now familiar Instant Search back in 2010. The idea was to make searching faster by updating the results of your search in real time while you typed. Now the company is dropping the feature, according to SearchEngineLand, to bring it more in line with mobile search. The change is effective today.

More than half of all Google searches happen on mobile, so it makes sense that Google would want to unify the way results are displayed across all devices. While you'll still be able to see search suggestions, the results below won't update until you click on Enter or a result, says SearchEngineLand.

"We launched Google Instant back in 2010 with the goal to provide users with the information they need as quickly as possible, even as they typed their searches on desktop devices," a Google spokesperson told Engadget in an email. "Since then, many more of our searches happen on mobile, with very different input and interaction and screen constraints. With this in mind, we have decided to remove Google Instant, so we can focus on ways to make Search even faster and more fluid on all devices."

Source: SearchEngineLand

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