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After Math: It’s bobsled time!

The 2018 Winter Olympics are starting up but Pyeongchang won’t be the only place crowning champions. This week we’ve already seen Waymo win out over Uber in court; Sasha ‘Scarlett’ Hostyn, the most successful woman in eSports, was victorious in an Olympic-backed Starcraft 2 tournament; and Amazon came up with yet another way to dominate the delivery market — 2-hour Whole Foods deliveries. Numbers, because how else will you count the scorecards?

1,218: That’s how many UAVs lit up the night sky over the Olympic opening ceremony — or at least a projection of their aerial display did anyway. Turns out that Pyeongchang’s high winds and low temperatures aren’t ideal conditions for coordinated drone performances.

$50,000: That’s how much Sasha ‘Scarlett’ Hostyn won in the Intel Extreme Masters StarCraft 2 tournament hosted in Pyeongchang ahead of this weekend’s Winter Olympics.

0.34 percent: That’s how much of a stake in Uber Waymo now owns, roughly worth $245 million, having settled a lawsuit with its self-driving technology rival over some 14,000 illicitly-obtained trade secrets.

$500,000: That’s the purse size for Tencent’s upcoming Arena of Valor World Cup. The 10-player MOBA tournament will be held in Los Angeles this July.

$150: Buzz Aldrin wants you to make like Quaid and get your ass to Mars. He’d also very much like to sell you this here solar-powered backpack from Sprayground’s new “Mission to Mars” line to use when you get there.

2 hours: That’s how long you’ll have to wait for your groceries to arrive now that Whole Foods is offering Amazon Prime-style rapid delivery. The service is only available in certain neighborhoods in Austin, Cincinnati, Dallas and Virginia Beach but will surely roll out to more cities in the months ahead. And then we’ll never have to leave our houses again.

caucasian female hand picking the cash from an ATM

30 years: We can’t all be winners, no matter what our moms tell us. Now these two guys, these two knuckleheads right here, who tried to steal $9,000 from an ATM using the hot new jackpotting technique? These guys are now set to spend up to the next three decades in prison.

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About Ms. A. C. Kennedy

Ms. A. C. Kennedy
My name is Ms A C Kennedy and I am a Health practitioner and Consultant by day and a serial blogger by night. I luv family, life and learning new things. I especially luv learning how to improve my business. I also luv helping and sharing my information with others. Don't forget to ask me anything!

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Existing EV batteries could be recharged five times faster

Lithium-ion batteries have massively improved in the last half-decade, but there are still issues. The biggest, especially for EVs, is that charging takes too long to make them as useful as regular cars for highway driving. Researchers from the University of Warwick (WMG) have discovered that we may not need to be so patient, though. They developed a new type of sensor that measures internal battery temperatures and discovered that we can probably recharge them up to five times quicker without overheating problems.

Overcharging a lithium-ion battery anode can lead to lithium buildup, which can break through a battery's separator, create a short-circuit and cause catastrophic failure. That can cause the electrolyte to emit gases and literally blow up the battery, so manufacturers impose strict charging power limits to prevent it.

Those limits are based on hard-to-measure internal temperatures, however, which is where the WMG probe comes in. It's a fiber optic sensor, protected by a chemical layer that can be directly inserted into a lithium-ion cell to give highly precise thermal measurements without affecting its performance.

The team tested the sensor on standard 18650 li-ion cells, used in Tesla's Model S and X, among other EVs. They discovered that they can be charged five times faster than previously thought without damage. Such speeds would reduce battery life, but if used judiciously, the impact would be minimized, said lead researcher Dr. Tazdin Amietszajew.

Faster charging as always comes at the expense of overall battery life but many consumers would welcome the ability to charge a vehicle battery quickly when short journey times are required and then to switch to standard charge periods at other times.

There's still some work to do. While the research showed the li-ion cells can support higher temperatures, EVs and charging systems would have to have "precisely tuned profiles/limits" to prevent problems. It's also not clear how battery makers would install the sensors in the cells.

Nevertheless, it shows a lot of promise for much faster charging speeds in the near future. Even if battery capacities stayed the same, charging in 5 minutes instead of 25 could flip a lot of drivers over to the green side.

Via: Clean Technica

Source: University of Warwick

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